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's to u.s. lawmakers: avert the fiscal cliff, or risk a credit downgrade. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. we're going global with legendary investor mark mobius, franklin templeton's top strategist on the state of emerging markets now. >> susie: and picture this: the u.s. is just a few years away from being the world's top oil producer, and self-sufficient. we'll tell you who's making that prediction, and investment strategies for your portfolio. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s.'s top-notch credit rating is at risk. that's the warning today from moody's investor's service. the ratings agency told u.s. lawmakers that when it comes to the fiscal cliff, the time to act is now, not next year. moody's said if action on averting the cliff is delayed until 2013, it might downgrade the stellar credit rating on u.s. debt. right now moody's has a negative outlook on the u.s. economy. worries about a fiscal freefall, kept wall street stocks in check: the dow and nasdaq fell a fraction, while the s&p was up a fraction. american businesses are not only concerned about the fis
. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. massive spending cuts and tax hikes are set to hit the u.s. economy on january first. by most estimates if we go over the cliff, the u.s. economy will plunge into recession. >> susie: we look at the impact of the coming cliff and whether congress and the white house can strike a deal. >> tom: that and more tonight on n.b.r.! it was the chairman of the federal reserve ben bernanke who first called it a fiscal cliff. he described the coming automatic cuts in government spending and increases in taxes as, quote, "a massive fiscal cliff," end quote. here's what he was describing: on january 1, 2013, tax breaks worth $416 billion will expire. spending on things like defense, medicare payments to doctors will be slashed by $65 billion. add it all up and you are talking about cutting roughly half a trillion dollars from the federal budget. the congressional budget office and others warn going over the cliff will send the economy into a recession in the first half of next year. it was congress and the white house that set the deadline in hopes of forcing each other to c
and led to the worst oil spill in u.s. history. in its guilty plea, b.p. said it deeply regrets the loss of life and almost five million barrels of oil that into the gulf. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: justice department officials hope today's settlement and criminal pleas will bring justice to the families of the men who died when the "deepwater horizon" exploded. >> perhaps the greatest tragedy is that the deaths of the 11 men on board the "deepwater horizon" could have been avoided. the explosion of the rig was a disaster that resulted from b.p.'s culture of privileging profit over prudence. >> reporter: b.p. has agreed to plead guilty to 11 counts of felony manslaughter and one felony count of lying to congress. in addition, two b.p. supervisors on the deepwater rig have been charged with 23 counts of manslaughter. another b.p. executive was charged with lying to congress. b.p. will also pay a record- setting $4 billion in criminal fines and penalties. thrown in with the criminal charges is a civil settlement with the securities and exchange commission. b.p. will pay more than h
is on assignment tonight. a repeated warning to washington-- if the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff, it would push the economy into a recession. and late today, a top credit rating agency puts the odds of going off the cliff at 15%. plus, how g.o.p. economic policies could change as election day demographics change. that and more tonight on nbr! the u.s. economy would be driven into recession next year if the fiscal cliff is not solved in time. that's the warning again today from the congressional budget office. and the standard and poor's ratings agency said there's an increasing chance we will go over that cliff of tax increases and spending cuts. it puts the odds at 15%. still, s&p is optimistic about a solution, saying "the most likely scenario, in our view, is that policymakers reach sufficient political compromise in time to avoid most, if not all, potential economic effects of the cliff." both s&p and the congressional budget office warned unemployment would go over 9% by the end of next year if the cliff is triggered. those s&p comments hit the market in the last 30 minutes of trading, ext
classes this year. >> tom: the u.s. economy was hotter than first thought this summer. in the newest data on the gross domestic product, the economy grew in the third quarter at its fastest pace of the year. the revised report said the economy grew at a 2.7% clip. that's well above the previously reported 2% growth. adding fuel was restocking inventories, which is not expected to continue. higher federal government spending and stronger u.s. exports also helped. the impact super-storm sandy has had on the job market seems to be dissipating. 23,000 fewer americans filed for first-time unemployment benefits during thanksgiving week compared to a week earlier. the total was 393,000. it had jumped to over 400,000 in the weeks following the storm. still, we saw just modest gains on wall street today-- the dow rose 36 points, the nasdaq was up 20, and the s&p 500 added six. >> tom: the roster of companies announcing special one-time paydays for their shareholders continued growing today. taxes on stock dividends are currently set at 15%. but with no deal on the fiscal cliff, dividends will be t
. tom will be along later in the program. congress officially gets back to preventing the u.s. economy from falling off the fiscal cliff. while washington struggles on a fiscal cliff deal, what should you do about your portfolio? jeff applegate has some answers. he's chief investment officer at morgan stanley smith barney. and home depot hammers home strong gains and lays the foundation for a strong quarter ahead. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." it was another day of cliff- watching here on wall street today. investors and traders are waiting to hear what happens at an important white house meeting on friday between president obama and congressional leaders. they will be talking about ways to solve the so-called "fiscal cliff" dilemma. investors appear cautious about making any big moves until they know whether the cliff will trigger increases in capital gains and dividend taxes. the dow fell almost 59 points, the nasdaq lost 20, and the s&p was down five. meanwhile, in washington, congress returned to work for the first time since september. lawmakers face a long "to-do list," and g
history of debt in the u.s.; and h.i.v. infections in young people. but first, the other news of the day, here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: wall street lost ground today over renewed concerns that deficit talks in washington are not making progress. the dow jones industrial average was down 89 points to close at 12,878. the nasdaq fell nine points to close below 2968. earlier, there were more signs of a recovery home prices went up in most major u.s. cities by 3% in september compared to a year ago. america's ambassador to the u.n. failed to mollify senate critics today on the attack at the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. susan rice met with republican senators who've criticized her for saying-- five days after the attack-- that anti-american protests were to blame. in fact, u.s. officials already knew it was a terrorist strike. today, rice blamed faulty intelligence. but senator lindsey graham said he was unimpressed. bottom line, i'm more disturbed now than i was before that the 16 september explanation about how four americans died in benghazi libya by ambassador rice i thin
can do if the u.s. heads into recession because of the fiscal cliff, bernanke says, not much. >> in the worse case scenario, where the economy goes off the broad fiscal cliff, the largest fiscal cliff, which, according the c.b.o. and our analysis, would send the u.s. economy into recession, i don't think the fed has the tools to offset that. >> susie: members of the audience agreed. >> he was very frank in saying, you know, "we can try," he essentially said, "we will try, but we don't have anything in our arsenal that comes close." >> susie: bernanke is already using the weapons in his arsenal to fix the job market, which he said today is still "unhealthy". he also repeated the fed's plan to keep interest rates super low at least into 2015. >> we will want to be sure that the recovery is established before we begin to normalize policy. we hope that such assurances will reduce uncertainty and increase confidence among households and businesses. >> susie: but bernanke gave no hints on when americans can expect to see higher rates. >> the further we go down the road, the questio
charges and agrees to pay the largest single criminal fine in u.s. history. we examine the legal resolution of the gulf coast spill, two years later. >> suarez: science correspondent miles o'brien asks an age old question. why do we sleep? the answer comes from an unlikely underwater source. >> no, you don't need more sleep? you're getting plenty of sleep right? are you getting plenty of sleep? yes. >> brown: china's new leader will head both the communist party and the military. we assess the change at the top in beijing. >> suarez: and we close with the story of volunteers stepping up to help victims of hurricane sandy in the borough of queens in new york. >> there's people who have been without attention for a long time. some with, some without running water. definitely without power. you know, so as time goes, it gets worse. and i'm afraid if we don't like, really get this situation under control. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connect
evening i susie gharib. u.s. stocks are trading again, after hurricane sandy forces an historic two-day shutdown. >> gom: llll street gets back to business, as damage and recovery estimates start to climb, plus,e what it takes to restore power to millions in the northeast. >> susie: and with stocks open for trading, no surpri, home depot was the dow's standout., >> tom: lots ahead, that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: an historic day on here on wall street, after the storm of the century knocked down the financial district. us stoto markets resumedtsed operations today after two days in the dark, stocks were little changed: both the dow and the nasdaq fell 10 points, but the s&p 500 gained a fraction. trading here at the new york stock exchange opened without a hitch. th new york stock exchange opened right on time. and as new york's mayor bloomberg rang the opening bell this morning, traders were happy to be back to work. it looked like a normal day, with the buzz of activity, traders milling about. it was anything but normal no one knows that better than larry leibowitz, t
: just finally quickly, evidence of a u.s. role there? >> i spoke to a u.s. official today about that. it's interesting. the u role from what we hear is essential to offer words of encouragement to both sides. they keep stressing that egypt is really leading this and that they don't need this sort of push that one would expect. that said, there's a frustration in congress by the comments that hamid morsi, the president, made here in support of hamas. lindsey graham came out on sunday and said that congress was watching it very closely. the u.s. says that egypt is taking the initiative on its own, that the u.s. role is ancillary, that the u.s. is monitoring it. president obama has spoken to morsi. as recently as today. hillary clinton has spoken to her counterpart and the prime minister here that the u.s. does have a role. but that egypt is willingly leading the peace negotiations. >> woodruff: nancy yousef, on the story in cairo. nancy yousef with mcclatchy, thank you very much. >> thank you. >> woodruff: oline we have a first person account from journalist stephanie freid, who writes abo
on your day-to-day business? >> i'm looking more am i going to continue to grow outside of the u.s. or invest in my facilities in the u.s. in the main, that's still true, but you can't just act like everything is fine when it is not. and i don't know all of the details of his answer, but i can't imagine he said he is acting like nothing is going on out there. >> susie: so you talk about taxes, and taxes are at the center of all of these negotiations. are you open to new taxes? how would that impact your business? >> well, at the end of the day, we all recognize that we need entitlement reform in the country. that's actually the big nut. that's the thing that needs to happen. the only way you're going to get that, though, is by having some kind of tax increase.p4l& >> susie: well, i hope it all works out. thank you so much, david. we really appreciate your time. >> thank you, nice to be here. >> susie: we're speaking with david cote, c.e.o. of honeywell. >> tom: still to come, with the fiscal cliff fast approaching, more companies are offering special dividends with the threat of hi
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: general john allen, the top u.s. commander in afghanistan, is under investigation for sending messages to a woman linked to the scandal that forced c.i.a. director petraus to resign. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on what were termed "potentially inappropriate" e- mails and documents, and we examine if and when the white house and congress should have been alerted. >> ifill: then, the senate and the house of representatives get back to work. judy woodruff looks at the long list of challenges ahead. >> brown: one item on the agenda is the so-called fiscal cliff , and that was the focus of a white house meeting today with liberal leaders. we talk with two participants. >> ifill: plus, from "our food for nine billion" series, special correspondent mary kay magistad reports on china's moves to satisfy a growing demand for meat. it has transformed lives and diets over the past 30 years meat con suption per cap to has quadrupled and city dwellers e
of political solution? and what will the u.s. role be. >> i disagree with a lot of things that was said now. but one thing i very strongly agree. there is no political solution. and there can to the be a political solution because what you have in gaza is an organization dedicated it to the destruction of israel, dedicated to killing of jews. this is what they say openly. i mean this is not an interpretation of what they're saying. this is what they're saying. as long as the threat exists they will fight israel. they are committed to an anti-sellity-- anti-semitic of killing juice jews, it's in their charter n their document t is what they are openly saying. they are not leave israel alone regard will of what is happening. so once israel withdraws totally from the gaza strip they started shelling israeli cities. and i also agree that whatever israel can achieve, and it can achieve quite a lot. it achieved four years of tranquillity, relative tranquillity. but only can achieve relative tranquillity for a while and then it will come up again because the hamas is committed to the destruction o
the election. u.s. businesses added 171,000 jobs in october across many industries. four days after sandy, the gas crunch in jersey, access to cash in the northeast and controversy nixes sunday's running of the new york ci maratho that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" we begin with jobs. employers beefed up their payrolls last month, adding more bs than expected as more americans counted themselves among the labor forcbs the official labor department count shows 171,000 jobs wereor created last month. that's much stronger than the 125,000 analysts were looking for. and the government revised its september w job count up to 148,000. thanks to more people lookingco for work, the unemployment rate rose slightly t7.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the key message there is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit better than what we've been seeing. that is enough over the long
. beyond the u.s. elections, europe also brought fresh worries for investors with concerns in greece, and germany. here's how the numbers stacked up on wall street. the dow lost 312 points, at it's worst point of the day, the blue chip index was down 369 points. the nasdaq tumbled nearly 75 points and the s&p 500 off 33. suzanne pratt takes a look at where the market goes from here. >> reporter: let's be candid. this is not the election outcome that wall street wanted to see. after all many investors believe president obama's tax policies will hurt corporate profits. on top of that there's the likelihood of more regulation in the president's second term. those concerns were evident in selling today of energy, banking and healthcare stocks. a quick look at the price board at the new york stock exchange is a good barometer for the worrywarts out there. wall street veteran teddy weissberg says many investors are just plain upset. >> there was an expectation that we would have some change and a change in the policies. and, i think with obama getting re-elected there are a lot of folks th
that that will plunge the u.s. economy into recession and an unemployment rate back over 9%. >> i'm about in agreement with them. i think there are a few details i'm looking for. i look for the bush tax cuts to expire, the payroll tax holiday to expire, and that tow moo is a 3% cracks of the fiscal budget, and that would, indeed, push, in my analysis, push the u.s. back into recession. >> tom: what's the impact if we go over the cliff but are able to pull ourselves back, say, the first or second week in january. some are saying there are some odds of that happening. we could go over the cliff do see the threat but pull ourselves back. could there be damage done that's irreversible? >> there-- when you think about it, the fiscal cliff is sort of kind of a theoretical thing. the treasury, as we saw last year when we dealt with the debt ceiling crisis. the treasury has been groomed to adjusting so maybe the checks they can't write or the cuts they make might be later in the next few months. it gives them a little bit more time. the bush tax cuts, well, that would happen, but things could be grandfathered
days have been rough for the stock market. but, given those are the same eight days since the u.s. election, it doesn't take a genius to figure out what's put investors in a funk. it's all about what's happening 200 miles from wall street. negotiations between the white house and congress are holding equities hostage. >> we are right now pricing in the instability of policymaking. politics are very difficult to forecast. if you think markets are difficult to forecast, try forecasting politics. >> reporter: if discussions are at impasse, stocks sink as they have for the past several days. if progress on the fiscal cliff is constructive, the market gains ground. but, floor broker doreen mogavero thinks today's gain were technical. >> i think honestly people were covering shorts. i don't think it was very euphoric rally where people were saying oh good now we can move on. i think people were saying better not be short going into this weekend in case the come up with a template for a deal before thanksgiving. >> reporter: prior to the election, the s&p 500 was up an impressive 13% for
, a longtime u.s. diplomat and mideast envoy, serving in the george h.w. bush, clinton, and obama administrations. he's now a counselor at the washington institute for near east policy. and khaled elgindy, a palestinian participant in the 2007 annapolis peace negotiations, and now a fellow at the saban center for middle east policy at the brookings institution. i want to start with you. your reading on where things stand tonight in termed of a pause or cease-fire. >> i do think the outlines of the cease-fire have probably been shapedded at this point. i think the secretary of state is there and has a chance to finalize this by, in a sense, becoming the, i think, the repository of the commitments that each side has made. i think one of the things that's going on right now is trying to make certain that all the understandings are understood the same way by each side and whatever promises are being made will now be promises made to her as well. in effect she becomes almost the holder of those as a kind of deposit. that, i think, is a chance for the cease-fire to actually be implement
for about a fifth of all packaged foods sold in the u.s., and at 70 $billion, we're talking big business. conagra is known for name brands like pam, slim jim, and reddi whip, and it also makes some private label goods. ralcorp is the top manufacturer of growing store brand categories such as cereal and pasta, and it supplies companies like walmart and mcdonald's. together, conagra and ralcorp could become a private label powerhouse. and they might actually make store brand food that's good to eat. >> with this acquisition, what conagra can do that perhaps ralcorp couldn't is they can bring their expertise on the branded side on innovation and r&d, and elevate even more the quality of their products from where they are today. >> reporter: that means more americans are likely to find private label foods more palatable. suzanne pratt, nbr, new york. >> susie: that big conagra deal didn't get much attention on wall street today. investors were more concerned about the debt problems in europe and the fiscal cliff crisis here in the u.s. stocks fell late today after senate majority leader harr
to get this economy gointa >> woodruff: we have two takes on the battle for the u.s. senate, benning with the big money being spent in the most competitive races. we talk with npr's tamara keith. >> brown: and from arizona, we have the story of a former surgeon general challenging a, six-term congressman for an open seat. >> woodruff: plus on the daily download, margaret warner looks at another way to reach out to voters with last minute messages on twitter. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs our has been provided by: ou ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the losses in life and property kept growing today, in the wake of "sandy". the death toll reached 92 and the focus on physical damage shifted to new jersey, where the monster storm blasted barrier islands and other w
decades and teaches at the u.s. naval academy. and sari horwitz is an investigative reporter at the "washington post." sari, we have watchedded shoes dropping on this all weekend. what new have we learned today? >> hi, gwen. we're now learning a little bit more about how this investigation started and more of what the f.b.i. found. i mean there have been a lot of questions of why does the f.b.i. do an investigation into harassing emails? i mean lots of people get harassing emails. i get harassing emails but what we found today was that this woman jo kelly who was a friend of the petraeus family, and she lived in tampa, she actually knew an f.b.i. agent and mentioned to him that in june she mentioned to him that she had been receiving these very sort of troubling, strange, bizarre accusatory emails. and gave them to him. he started the investigation. that's how it began in june. and... >> ifill: as we watch this time line unfold, sari, we can't help but ask who knew what when? for instance, we gather that the justice department, the f.b.i. knew about this some time ago. but th
; the shopping frenzy in the u.s. a day early; the lives of native americans and the demand for meat in china. but first, the other news of the day. in syria, rebel fighters gained more momentum in the east today. they seized a key army base at mayadeen and took control of its artillery stockpiles. to the north, syrian government warplanes flattened a building next to a hospital in aleppo overnight. at least 15 people were killed. the airstrikes damaged one of the last remaining sources of medical aid for civilians there. a taliban suicide bomber killed 23 people in a procession of shi-ite muslims in pakistan. the attack happened near midnight when the bomber tried to join a religious gathering in rawalpindi. at least 62 people were wounded, including six policemen. this is the latest in a string of bombings targeting shi-ites during their holiest month of the year. the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. defended her first account of the attack on the consulate in benghazi, libya. susan rice has come under fire by critics who say she gave misleading information about the nature of the attack and the
, on a sunday talk show, of the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. at the time, she said it began as an anti-american protest, but she now says she was working off faulty intelligence. rice met with collins for 90 minutes today, but afterward the senator remained critical. >> i still have many questions that remain unanswered. i continue to be troubled by the fact that the u.n. ambassador decided to play what was essentially a political role at the height of the contentious presidential election campaign by agreeing to go on the sunday shows to present the administration's position. >> sreenivasan: collins stopped short of joining other republican senators who have said they will oppose rice if she is nominated to be secretary of state. later, president obama again defended rice. he called her extraordinary, and cabinet members joined him in applause. a pair of suicide car bombers in syria blew themselves up today in a suburb of damascus. at least 34 people were killed. the twin explosions shattered buildings and left streets littered with rubble. in addition to the dead, the stat
heats up. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s. presidential election is just one ay away, and that was the hot topic here on wall street. but investors were still cautious about making major moves ahead of the election, so stocks posted just modest gains, and trading volume was light. the dow re 19 points, thee nasdaq added 17, and the s&p up three points. but, where stocks go from here may depend on who wins the white house tomorrow night. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: wall street is hardly back to normal, with reminders of hurricane sandy still obvious everywhere. but, at least the presidential election could provide a distraction for the coping with the storm's aftermath. the question is will the stock market continue to distract in the days following tomorrow'sng big contest? that may depend on its outcome. like many on wall street, nyse trader jonathan corpina predicts a mitt romney win will ba biga win for stock prices. >> i think when you see new regimes, new presidents come in to play isort of a turmoil time, that change is always viewed as good
. io >> woodruff: the u.s. death toll from the giant storm named sandy has risen to at least 63 today. about 6.5 million homes and businesses are still without electricity though there were signs of daily life returning to its usual rhythm in some ples. a familiar sound returned to lower manhattan streets last night. ( horns honking ) the power did not. police helped direct traffic with signals still dark, but one taxi driver said it wasn't worth the risk. >> it's been dangerous. i've got to go home, i'll walk. there's no traffic signal light, no nothing there. >> woodruff: you're going home? you're done? >> i'm done already. >> woodruff: it wasn't much easier for pedestrians who made their way on foot, some with only flashlights leading the way. >> it's really unsettling because we don't have power. we don't know what's going on. we don't have anywhere to get to televisions. >> woodruff: many people flocked to mobile charging stations across the city. plugging in cell phones and other devices. but today brought s e sign of things slowly returning to normal in the big apple. this mor
an economy in need of a spark find one in octob? u.s. employers across nearly all sectors were hiring, for a net gain of 171,000 new jobs. the labor department also revised its august and september figures higher, by 84,000. all told, it signaled slow but steady growth, and it was news that president obama wanted to play up in the campaign's final weekend, especially in one critical state. >> "oh (io), oh (io)" >> brown: the president made three stops in the buckeye state,tarting in hilliard, just outside columbus. >> in 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression.at and today, our businesses have created nearly five and a half million new jobs. and this morning, we learned that companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. ( applause ) >> brown: and the trend line seemed promising, as well. since july, the economy has added an average of 173,000 jobs per month, up from just 67,000 a month in the spring. at the same time, though, the unemployment rate ticked up a tenth of a point in october to 7.
and john mccain. they attacked her for saying the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya, had been a spontaneous outburst of muslim anger when officials already knew it was a terrorist attack. and they insisted they'd oppose having her replace hillary clinton, who's stepping down as secretary of state. >> this is about the role she played around four dead americans when it seems to be that the story coming out of the administration-- and she's the point person-- is so disconnected from reality, i don't trust her. and the reason i don't trust her is because i think she knew better, and if she didn't know better, she shouldn't be the voice of america. >> reporter: in response, the president was vehement in his defense of ambassador rice. >> let me say specifically about susan rice, she has done exemplary work. she has represented the united states and our interests in the united nations with skill and professionalism and toughness and grace. as i've said before, she made an appearance at the request of the white house in which she gave her best understanding of the intelligence that
. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: the u.s. supreme court announced today it will hear a constitutional challenge to parts of the voting rights act of 1965. the landmark law requires all or parts of 16 states with a history of racial discrimination to get federal approval for changes in election rules or districts. shelby county, alabama, has sued, contending there has been major progress over the years, and federal oversight is no longer needed. arguments are expected early next year. a jetblue pilot who disrupted a cross-country flight will be set free. a federal judge in texas decided today not to have clayton osbon committed to a psychiatric hospital. passengers had to restrain osbon last march, as his plane flew from new york to las vegas. they said he ran through the cabin yelling about jesus and al qaeda. osbon was charged with interfering with a flight crew, but was found not guilty by reason of insanity. he's been undergoing a mental evaluation ever since. as a condition of his release, he will not be allowed to fly or board any pla
-led agreement or one broker bide both egypt and the u.s.? >> reporter: this is really being seen as an egyptian-brokered keel. i mean, the president here, is the only person involved that is actually speaking to both sides because they have contact wgz the israelis through the security channeles, which they've had for years. and, also, they are in contact with hamas. hose me mubarak was not in touch with hamas. they wouldn't speak to him at all and often closed the side to journalists it. the difference is mursi was able to speak to hamas and exprl mediate the deal. that's really never been possible before. of course, without american influence, this would never have come to pass. they are, in speaking to egyptian officials and speaking to palestinian officiales, everybody here said we really need the americans to lean on israel and only when hillary clinton came to the region, did a deal come to fruition. >> and finally, just even in the next day or days, is it clear how this is enforced? it didn't seem to be in any language, other than sort of leaving it to each side to enforce the deal. >> r
, mostly palestinians. the so-called "black friday" shopping frenzy in the u.s. began in earnest today, and in some cases, it got started last night, before thanksgiving was even over. some shoppers had been searching for bargains all night long. >> we started at about 10:00 p.m., and we've been going ever since. >> we go like out, like, 12:00 a.m. or 1:00 a.m. and really save a lot of money. >> sreenivasan: others were simply following a holiday tradition. >> i didn't come crazy early when it was mobbed, so i don't necessarily get the best deal on everything, but it's just getting out and seeing everybody and having fun. >> sreenivasan: across the country, many began their holiday shopping late thursday evening, as big box stores like target, walmart and toys "r" us opened hours before midnight, blurring the line between black friday and thanksgiving day. >> it's almost been like an arms race. first, it was 8:00, then 7:00, then 6:00, then 4:00 in the morning, then midnight. but we have to be responsive to the competitive environment. >> sreenivasan: retailers rely on november and dec
% of businesses in the u.s. are small businesses and they employ about half the nation's workforce. >> small businesses are critical to the economy. if you go back the last 20 years, they've created most of the new jobs in the u.s. economy. and we know that we are struggling with job creation. so shopping small is actually one way to build the confidence in growth of small businesses. which will only help produce more jobs in the future. >> reporter: for leisl and company, small business saturday provides a sales lift during an otherwise slow period. >> we're in kind of a unique industry. for most retailers, it's all about november and december. for us, november and december are actually our slowest months of the year. people don't want to take on new large craft projects just before the holiday. >> reporter: for other firms, the arrival of small business saturday is especially important this year, coming a month after superstorm sandy. >> the reality of sandy is that most of us lost-- in the east village at least-- at least a week's worth of sales. and that hurts. and small business saturda
will lead daily operationsmp >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: u.s. markets turned their attention back to the my today; investors ande traders liked what they heard. americans are feeling the most optimistic they have been in nearly five years about their finances and the outlook for the economy. the conference board's confidence index jumped to a reading of 72.2 last month. driving that gain, an improving job market. new claims for unemployment insance fell by 9,000 in the past week to 363,000, showing modest improvement in the jobs picture. we'll have more on jobs in a moment. as for stocks, the dow gained 136 points, the nasdaq was upel 42, the s&pdding 15.15 >> susie: but economists say that encouraging report on jobless claims and the confidence survey were collected before hurricane sandy. meanwhile, the effects of the monster storm are paralyzing much of new jersey andew york city here's an update: four and a half million people are still without power, and it could take another ten days before power is restored. limited flights have re ad atme all of the ai
, the u.s. economy would suffer big time. the obama administration's economists estimate consumers would spend about $200 billion less next year than they would have otherwise. congress and the administration have only a few more weeks to nail down a deal. but that deal will have to address some tough issues, including entitlement reform. darren gersh explains. >> reporter: the big money in entitlements is in health care, and that means any grand bargain to avoid the fiscal cliff will slice away at one of the nation's most popular programs. >> medicare is clearly in the gunsights. >> reporter: it's possible congress and the president could agree to save $300 to $400 billion from medicare by cutting fees for doctors and hospitals. but analysts worry slashing payments won't make the health care system more efficient. >> this is not really a way to structurally change medicare and if you don't change the underlying incentives, you don't get long-term savings. >> reporter: progressives at the center for american progress say the government could save close to $150 billion by squeezing the pr
for any u.s. company that's doing business with europe or sell things to europe. obviously, their revenues and their earnings are going to suffer from that. so that's a big part of it. and the other part of it is the concerns, the ongoing concerns about the fiscal cliff, meaning the automatic increase in taxes and spending cuts that are going to occur at the federal government left at the end of this year, unless something is done about it. and the belief is that, you know, with things being sort of unchanged in washington, obama winning, the republicans still controlling the house of representatives, the democrats controlling the senate, that it's business as usual and that we'll have trouble avoiding that fiscal cliff at the end of the year. that might mean bad things for the u.s. economy. so i think those are both very significant concerns, and weighed on investors today ask they obviously responded by selling stocks. >> sreenivasan: we heard late today grooeps passed its austerity measures through its parliament. is that likely to give the markets a bounce? >> yeah, i think you're goin
neglect seems to be coming true in syria. >> warner: quickly, how close is the u.s. to changing its policy at all from what you've been able to discern? >> i think it is on terms of recognizing the government in exile which we -- was formed in doha. in terms of arming the opposition, i'm not sure. it might be something that's been debated to death. there's no action out of the obama administration. we were hoping it was going to happen earlier, it didn't happen and it seems now that the people -- the jihadists and salafists have the arms now including shoulder-fired anti-aircraft systems and the secular forces that came out of the mainstream that we could deal with don't seem to have those weapons and the question is what is the obama administration going to do now? >> warner: tough decision. patrick tabler, thank you. >> my pleasure. >> suarez: still to come on the "newshour": political turmoil in egypt; arizona's new senator; a broad range of steps for a minnesota dance company and the college conference switches. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreeniva
jimmy carter, and editor of "u.s. news and world report," he's received both the national book award. you can read his blog at theatlantic.com. jim fallows, it's good to see you. >> thank you so much, bill. honor and pleasure to be here. >> what surprised you about this election? >> i guess what surprised me is, as the results sink in in the days after the election, how thorough going was the repudiation of what had seemed the unstoppable tea party momentum of the previous two years. and i think the fact also that in the days before the election, essentially, the right wing is saying, "yes, this is going to go our way again, as it did in 2010." i was in touch with lots of people in the romney campaign who really thought they were going to win and win big. it's been fascinating. there's been very little of the narrative from the right saying, "this was stolen, it was all fraud," et cetera, et cetera. and i think they may be sinking on them that they were out of touch with the actual nature of the u.s. now. >> you wrote the other day that the reelection of obama is actually more impres
're not. and we do have the disconnect in the u.s. economy between consumers on the one hand-- and they account for 70% of the economy-- but they're feeling fairly good about things. whereas businesses are not, and businesses tend to be more worried about things like the fiscal cliff, they're more worried about the troubles in europe, they're more worried about the slowdown in china. you do have the disconnect. the big concern is which way is it going to go? who is going to win this tug-of-war? so far it's the consumer but let's hope it's not the other direction because as i said, let's hope that the businesses will eventually come around to thinking about things the way consumers are. . >> brown: nancy cohen, i want to come back to you on the question of online shopping and the changed landscape. does the rise of online shopping have a real impact on the economy or is it sort of shifting, transferring, where people buy their things? >> well, that's a very open question, partly because this is so new. the marriage and the magic of online plus brickes and mortar. i mean, there
the event at the u.s. consulate in nibenghazi libya on september 11, when four americans were killed, including ambassador christopher stevens. >> other people were -- >> the truth is, infoation comes in, folks put it out thought the process, people , sy it's still incomplete. what i was up clear is we're going to do an investigation and figure out what happened.sa >> as part of the investigation, is it helping the communication between the divisions of, not just what happened in benghazi, but what happened within? i don't know, i would say even you wod admit, it was not the optimal response, at least to the american people as far as us being on the same page. >> here's what i'll say. >> yeah. >> if four americans get killed, it's not optimal. >> right. >> and we're going to fix it. and -- >> all of it? >> all of it. and what happens dung the course of the presidency is that the egovernment is a big operation, at any given time, something screws up, and you make that you find out what's broken and you fix it. >> question: did jon stewart unintentionally do president a disserviceby f
the cliff, so to spea some economists are saying that means th the u.s. economy goes into recession. >> well, i think we would go into recession, we'd exacerbate our unemployment, underemployment problems, unless it was reversed very quickly. but what a lot of people haven't focused on is, you know, it takes 60 votes to get something through the senate unless you use something called budget reconciliation, which only requires a majority vote. under current rules you can only use that if you're making the deficit less, not more. so if you try to reverse a tax increase or you try to reverse a spending cut, you're not going to be able to do that unless you have 60 votes. and that's going to be tough. >> susie: all right, we have ameacan voters in the polls now who are going to decide who's the next president. but from your point of view, which candidate has the best plans tootsolve this fiscal isis, if at all? we have less than a minute. >> in all candor, susie, neither one of them have lay out a comprehensive and credible plan to solve this problem. i will, however, say that i think thatgovern
expert john challenger. he's in good company. the congressional budget office has warned if the u.s. economy goes over the fiscal cliff, unemployment next year will jump to over 9%. >> susie: hiring is also a big concern for the federal reserve. those worries could lead the central bank to extend its bond buying program to keep stimulating the economy. ruben ramirez reports from washington. >> reporter: the latest talk inside the fed is that its asset purchase plan appears to be working. fed policymakers say the strategy is helping financial markets, auto buying, and housing. that's why economist think the fed's buying spree continues into next year: >> a number of participants continue to expect that they are going to replace operation twist with straight asset purchases once operation twist expires in december. >> reporter: the fed has been buying back about $85 billion a month of long term bonds and mortgage backed securities. in minutes of its last meeting release today, fed officials, "generally agreed that a recovery in housing activity now appeared to be under way." but while
.b.r.," new york. >> tom: u.s. stocks staged their best single session rally in weeks. the s&p 500 was strong from the opening bell, finishing at its highest price of the session. up 2%. trading volume was 707 million shares on the big board. just under 1.8 billion on the nasdaq. fueling today's rally: the materials sector jumped 2.9%, technology bounced back 2.8%, and telecommunications was up 2.3%. a big help today was the biggest publicly traded company in the u.s.; apple. due to its size and influence in the s&p 500 and nasdaq, when apple moves, so do those indices. and today that was higher. apple jumped 7.2%, rallying more than 38 dollars per share. this was apple's second best single day gain this year. apple had been sinking since hitting an all time high in september. with today's gain, its down just over 19% from that record. we reported on the strong existing home sales report earlier. that helped improve the market sentiment. and home improvement retailer lowe's underscored that. the retailer earned $.40 per share, a nickel better than estimates. lowe's has been working to improv
anticipated. in addition to higher costs, deere said its profits were pinched by a stronger u.s. dollar cutting into its international sales margins. shares fell 3.7%. volume quadrupled with the stock falling to a six week low. for next year, deere expects to see the strongest demand for its equipment to come out of south america, driven by a booming commodity market there. we've seen a couple of beaten up mobile phone makers dial up signs of life in recent weeks, and they continued today. first, nokia. it was the most traded nasdaq listed stock today, rising 12.2%. shares are up 21% just since friday's close. it had been a heavily-shorted stock, meaning traders were betting on the price to drop. when those traders cover their positions, they have to buy shares, which can push the price up. in addition, nokia's newest lumia smart-phone has gotten a good reception with strong demand in some european markets. research in motion was up 5.7% today, bringing its gains since halloween to almost 30%. rimm is preparing to launch its newest blackberry device in the first quarter, after many mont
not everyone but most of the public housing buildings and the >> reporter: and the u.s.ffered secretary of homeland security, janet napolitano, putting the housing issue at the top of her list as she toured damage in new jersey on sunday. >> the housing is really the number-one concern. we lost a lot of housing starts here in newin jersey. and we don't even know yet which of the houses are repairable and which are irreparable losses >> reporter: getting fuel was an ongoing trial as well. long lines have become a fixture at service stations in new jersey where gas is being rationed and in new york where it's not. >> the cops told us to go down and turn around. we've been around the block five tim. every time we come around it's a different cop telling us to go back the same way >> reporter: the lack of gas only added to the frustrations of some commuters today.t >> i ran out of gas so i had to turn around d go home before i had todush my car home. with all themy traffic and no trains running from brooklyn tor manhattan, i couldn't get in >> reporter: still 90% of new york city's 1700 sch
to you all night long. and we have one more projection. this is in a u.s. senate race in vermont. bernie sanders the independent who caucuses withct the democras in vermont has bin re-elected. before we look at some ofthe initial results in the senate races a word aboutth our projeions. the newshour doesn't call any race. it is our policy to report results as projected by the associated press. we'll also tell you when two television networks have calledo a winner in a state if the a.p. has not done so. now we'll go to geoffrey brown for more on these and other congressional matters. >> brown: thanks, gwen. i'm with, here with political editor christina bell and tony and stuart rothenberg, editor of the rothenberg political report. so if we start to look at the senate, they were talking about early for mitt romney on the presidential side. stu, that is not the case in this important senate race. >> we thought it might be when we first looked back months ago. >> brown: you mean months ago. richard murdoch ended up defeating richard lugar long-time senatorick lugar in a rathi bitter nasty r
her head, but you haven't put a dent in her spirit." afterward, the u.s. attorney for arizona spoke to reporters. >> it is our hope that the final resolution of this case will be a positive step towards their healing process, physically, emotionally, and psychologically. it was with them in mind that we entered into this plea agreement with the defendant. >> sreenivasan: loughner pleaded guilty, thereby avoiding the death penalty. a warplane from iran fired on an american drone over the persian gulf last week, but the drone escaped unharmed. a pentagon spokesman confirmed the incident today after news accounts surfaced. the spokesman said the unmanned aircraft was in international airspace, just outside iranian waters, when it was attacked. a c.i.a. drone crashed inside iran last year. in syria, president bashar al- assad vowed he will not leave the country to go into exile. he spoke in an interview with "russia today t.v." earlier this week, british prime minister david cameron suggested giving assad safe passage out of syria, if that would guarantee an end to the war. but the syri
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